Tendinitis in Plano

Chiropractic Plano TX Tendinitis

Tendinitis is the inflammation of a tendon, which is a thick fibrous cord that attaches muscles to bones. Pain generally occurs at the site where the tendon attaches to the bone. The main cause of tendinitis is repetitive, specific movements of a joint, or overuse. We treat any and all types of tendinitis and have great success getting rid of the pain associated with it. Contact our Plano chiropractors to learn more and schedule an appointment to see how they can help you get back to living a pain-free life.


The following are the most common that we treat at our Plano Clinic:

ACHILLES TENDINITIS

Achilles Tendinitis is inflammation of the Achilles (uh-KIL-eez) tendon, the band of tissue that connects calf muscles at the back of the lower leg to your heel bone. Achilles tendinitis is often a running injury or other sport-related injury resulting from overuse, intense exercise, jumping, or other activities that strain the tendon and calf muscles. If you’re experiencing pain and other symptoms such as swelling and stiffness in the Achilles tendon region, you are probably suffering from Achilles tendinitis or tendinitis (chronic inflammation of the tendon).

A Note from the Doctor: We treat all tendinitis issues including Achilles tendinitis with myotherapy, stretching, and rehabilitative exercises. The primary issue with any tendonitis is inflammation within the tendon and a lack of blood flow due to restrictions within the tissue. With myotherapy, we are able to break down these restrictions and create more blood flow to the injured area and allow the injury to heal quicker and more efficiently. Since most tendonitis problems are typically from overuse, rest may also be advised.

PSOAS (HIP FLEXOR) TENDINITIS

Psoas (hip flexor) Tendinitis inflammation of the iliopsoas tendon caused by acute trauma or overuse of repetitive hip flexion. Pain is usually felt in the anterior (front) of the hip or groin area. Soccer players, football kickers and any sport involving repetitive hip flexion may suffer from this condition.

A Note from the Doctor: We treat all tendonitis issues including psoas tendonitis with myotherapy, stretching, foam rolling, and rehabilitative exercises. The primary issue with any tendonitis is inflammation within the tendon and a lack of blood flow due to restrictions within the tissue. With myotherapy, we are able to break down these restrictions and create more blood flow to the injured area and allow the injury to heal quicker and more efficiently. Since most tendonitis problems are typically from overuse, rest may also be advised.

PATELLAR TENDINITIS

Patellar Tendinitis is an injury that affects the tendon connecting your kneecap (patella) to your shinbone. The patellar tendon plays a pivotal role in the way you use your legs. It helps your muscles extend your lower leg so that you can kick a ball, push the pedals on your bike and jump up in the air.

Patellar Tendinitis is most common in athletes whose sports involve frequent jumping — for instance, basketball, soccer, and volleyball players. For this reason, Patellar Tendinitis is commonly known as jumper’s knee (to differentiate, jumpers knee is tendinopathy resulting from the more degenerative condition in the patellar tendon).

A Note from the Doctor: We treat all Tendinitis issues including Patellar Tendinitis with myotherapy, stretching, foam rolling, and rehabilitative exercises. The primary issue with any Tendinitis is inflammation within the tendon and a lack of blood flow due to restrictions within the tissue. With myotherapy, we are able to break down these restrictions and create more blood flow to the injured area and allow the injury to heal quicker and more efficiently. Since most tendonitis problems are typically from overuse, rest may also be advised.

FROZEN SHOULDER/ADHESIVE CAPSULITS

Adhesive capsulitis, also known as frozen shoulder, is a condition characterized by stiffness and pain in your shoulder joint. Signs and symptoms begin gradually, worsen over time and then resolve, usually within a two-year period.

Your risk of developing frozen shoulder increases if you’ve recently had to have your arm in a sling for several weeks, or if you have had surgery in which your arm was immobilized in a specific position for a prolonged period. Many times it develops overnight without any significant cause. Individuals suffering from frozen shoulder often comment they just started having pain one day and it continued to get worse to the point they could not move their arm. It is typically described as a constant nuisance and terrible pain with any movement of the shoulder that will get worse at night.

A Note from the Doctor: Frozen shoulder is a tricky one due to not fully understanding the reason it arises. We utilize myotherapy, stretching, and rehabilitative exercises. We see the greatest change in the amount of pain the individual suffers with. Most often it is significantly decreased. The range of motion improves as well but may take several months to get the shoulder back to a full pain-free range of motion.

TENNIS ELBOW

Tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) is one of several overuse injuries that can affect your elbow. As you might assume, playing tennis is one cause of tennis elbow — but many other common activities can cause tennis elbow. Any activity where one is overusing the wrist extensors or supinators can cause pain to arise.

The pain of tennis elbow occurs primarily where the tendons of your forearm muscles attach to the bony prominence on the outside of your elbow (lateral epicondyle). Pain can also spread into your forearm and wrist.

A Note from the Doctor: We have good results in treating tennis elbow in a limited number of visits utilizing myotherapy, stretching, and rehabilitative exercises. The primary issue with tennis elbow is inflammation within the tendon at the attachment on the lateral epicondyle and a lack of blood flow due to restrictions within the tissue. With myotherapy, we are able to break down these restrictions and create more blood flow to the injured area and allow the injury to heal quicker and more efficiently. Rest may also be advised.

Many people that suffer from tennis elbow opt for cortisone injections which will help decrease the inflammation but is often described as “masking the pain” because it does not address the underlying problem. It can be a quick way to relieve the pain associated with tennis elbow and depending on the individual can have a long-lasting effect.

GOLFER’S ELBOW

Golfer’s elbow is pain and inflammation on the inner side of your elbow, where the tendons of your forearm muscles attach to the bony bump on the inside of your elbow. The pain may spread into your forearm and wrist. Golfer’s elbow — also known as medial epicondylitis — is similar to tennis elbow. But it occurs on the inside, rather than the outside, of your elbow. And it is not limited to golfers. Tennis players and others who repeatedly use their wrist flexors and pronators can develop golfer’s elbow.

A Note from the Doctor: Like Tennis elbow, Golfer’s elbow is treated in a similar fashion and we get the same great results utilizing myotherapy, stretching, and rehabilitative exercises in a limited number of visits. The primary issue with golfer's elbow is inflammation within the tendon at the attachment on the medial epicondyle and a lack of blood flow due to restrictions within the tissue. With myotherapy, we are able to break down these restrictions and create more blood flow to the injured area and allow the injury to heal quicker more efficiently. Rest may also be advised.

Many people that suffer from golfer's elbow opt for cortisone injections, which will help decrease the inflammation but is often described as “masking the pain” because it does not address the underlying problem. It can be a quick way to relieve the pain associated with golfer's elbow and depending on the individual can have a long-lasting effect.

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Thursday
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Friday
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Saturday & Sunday
Closed

The Tx Room

2845 Parkwood Blvd #200
Plano, TX 75093
P: (972) 781-2800
F: (972) 608-9680